Free Wood Fired Pizza Oven Plans

If you’re keen on building your own brick oven, but would prefer a kit where all the hard work has been done for you, check out our PreCut Brick Wood Fired Oven Kits! They come with all of the bricks cut to size, with custom made tools, formwork and much more, as well as step-by-step plans to follow.


The Principles of Building a Wood Fired Oven

We have been developing our own set of free plans for building Wood Fired Ovens for several years now, and are proud to have them available to download. The idea of these plans is to take you through the basic principles of building a Wood Fired Pizza Oven, from foundations to rendering. These aren't something we have just made up, or from old traditions - they are based on sound engineering principles. 

Ben Guilford is the owner of The Melbourne Fire Brick Company and has a double degree in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and spent several years working for Abigroup in structural concrete for bridge beams, piles and footings. In short, I know what I'm talking about!

We are putting the finishing touches on our Wood Fired Oven Building Principles at the moment, however if you're planning on building a concrete base to put your oven on, please feel free to download our Concrete Construction Principles - these are plans to assist you in building your oven stand. These plans cover everything from planning the location of your oven to pouring and screeding your suspended slab.

Download our free Plans for Concrete Construction


Forno Bravo Pompeii Oven Plans

One of our favourite free set of plans for building a DIY Wood Fired Pizza Oven are the ‘Pompeii Oven’ plans by Forno Bravo. They cover a lot of good information, and give you most of the basic principles for building ‘igloo style’ brick ovens. They are a bit vague in a few key areas, and because Forno Bravo are based in America all the measurements are in inches and feet… See the DIY Brick Pizza Oven Kits page for a few more tips if you’re thinking of building to these plans.
 

Accessing the Plans

To download the Forno Bravo ‘Pompeii’ Wood Fired Oven Plans, follow these steps;

  1. Click the link above to go to the Plans page on the Forno Bravo website
  2. You will see an online shopping page for the Pompeii Oven Instructions, click the red button that says ‘Add to cart’
  3. Click the ‘Checkout’ button
  4. Enter your details and click ‘Apply’
  5. Check the Terms and Conditions box, and click ‘Submit Order’

Forno Bravo will then process your order and send a download link to the email address you provided. 

Once you have the plans, you’ll no doubt be looking for materials to build your oven with! These plans are so popular that we have put together DIY Wood Fired Oven Kits with all of the raw materials needed to build the two most popular Pompeii Oven sizes: 36” and 42”. 


Rado Hand Barrel Oven Plans

While the most popular style of oven being built in Australia these days is the igloo shape, we still have plenty of customers approaching us looking to build a half barrel, or ‘tunnel’ style brick oven. These ovens are a lot easier to build than the igloo style, simply because if you design it right, there are far fewer brick cuts to do. The body of the oven itself is straightforward because it has a constant cross section, with a flat back. The tricky part is the mouth of the oven, where you funnel down from the large chamber into a smaller opening, and set up your flue gallery.

Currently the best place to look for free plans to build a barrel style oven is Traditional Ovens by Rado Hand. You can either download the plans through his website, or contact him and arrange for a CD to be sent to your door. 

The design that Rado uses has some similarity to the barrel oven shown in the book ‘The Bread Builders’ by Daniel Wing and Allan Scott. The barrel style oven is historically used mainly for bread baking, but that doesn't mean you can’t cook pizza or roasts in them. In fact, if you build an oven with the same amount of thermal mass, and the same insulation, both the dome shape and the barrel shape will perform very similarly. 

There are a lot of arguments that the dome shape performs better than the barrel shape, and there is probably a small measure of truth in that. For a commercial oven, this would be something to take into consideration, but for a domestic oven it really wouldn’t make enough difference to matter! If you’re tossing up which style to build in your backyard, just go for the style you prefer. Again, if you build using the same amount of thermal mass and the same insulation, both oven styles will perform very well.